Author Archives: Martyn Bliss

Another new video post: Nema + LPGPU2 == Teapots?

Think Silicon have uploaded a video to the you tube channel showcasing the capture tools running on Think Silicon’s Nema and converting the collected data such that it can be loaded by LPGPU2’s fork of AMD’s CodeXl modified by Codeplay. Notice the combined timeline and counter view enabling the display of the Open GL ES api calls and correlated hardware counters.

 

 

OpenGL, OpenGL ES & Vulkan Tools Survey Results

Introduction

Recently the developer ecosystem team at Samsung conducted a survey to elicit responses from developers on the tools that they are using currently on various platforms (desktop and mobile) and across APIs.

Context

The questions were grouped into categories that separated desktop from mobile (OpenGL vs. OpenGL ES), and capture & analysis from performance.

There were also some more open ended questions that attempted to discover the rationale behind tool choices and to discover if the lack of comprehensive open source multi-platform multi-API tools are impeding the creation and optimization of software across multiple vendors GPUs with the best performance experience for each.

Results

Capture & Analysis

Over 80% of respondents indicated that they have used RenderDoc in the preceding 6 months. The next closest tool garnered 32.6% (NVidia Nsight) showing a very clear indication of the popularity of RenderDoc.*

Desktop OpenGL

In the breakdown of preferred OpenGL capture & analysis tool RenderDoc took over 50% of the votes, the remaining portion split amongst the other tools with the next best score being 9.3% (NVidia Nsight). This category represents desktop GL developers (PC)

Mobile / OpenGL ES

In the mobile segment (OpenGL ES) the distribution of tool usage is much more evenly spread, Apples Xcode tools take the lead (17.9%) with RenderDoc second with 15.4%. To be considered however is that RenderDoc is not available for macOS and the tight integration of Xcode (as well as the capability of the tools) provides a strong tailwind for apple provided tools on the Mac.

Preferred mobile tool (Android/ios)

The distribution of tool usage in this segment is more evenly spread; Apples Xcode tools take the lead (25.7%) with RenderDoc second with 20%. To be considered however is that RenderDoc is not available for macOS and the tight integration of Xcode (as well as the capability of the tools) provides a strong tailwind for apple provided tools on the Mac.

Vulkan

The preferred Vulkan capture and analysis tool again favoured RenderDoc (61.1%) with the next highest coming in at 8.3% (vkTrace)

Preferred desktop tool

61% of respondents indicated that RenderDoc is their preferred tool. The next closest tool garnered 9.8% (NVidia Nsight) showing a very clear indication of the popularity of RenderDoc.

GPU Performance Analysis

GPU performance analysis tools are generally supplied by the GPU vendor. Unlike capture and analysis tools there is not currently an open source tool that works for multiple GPU’s due to the lack of a vendor neutral method for getting access to hardware performance counters. This void may be filled in the future by tools such as RenderDoc or LPGPU2 building upon a common & standardized API.

For GPU performance analysis the most popular tool was NVidia Nsight with almost half of the respondents using the tool (45.2%), with Qualcomm’s Snapdragon profiler being used by 38.1%.

Preferred OpenGL performance analyser

Given the results in the table above NVidia’s Nsight is unsurprisingly the most popular choice in this category with a third of respondents preferring it (33.3%). Another 3rd is made up equally of Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Profiler, Unity’s GPU Profiler and NVidia’s Linux Graphics Debugger.

Preferred OpenGL ES performance analyser

In this category Qualcomms’ Snapdragon Profiler and Apple’s XCode tie with 18.2% each, the next closest is NVidia’s Nsight at 15.2%.

Preferred Vulkan performance analyser

In this category NVidia’s Nsight is the most preferred at 28.6%, with ARM’s Streamline at 14.3%. This distribution may reflect that more Vulkan development is currently being done on the desktop vs. mobile devices.

Preferred mobile performance analyser

In the mobile performance analyser category Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Profiler and Apple’s XCode tie with 25% each, the next closest being Imagination’s PVRTune.

Preferred desktop performance analyser

NVidia’s Nsight is the preferred choice of 51.6% of respondents with the next closest Unity’s GPU profiler with 12.9%.

Developer satisfaction stats

The most important factor for performance tool preference was the availability of the tool on their primary target. This was seen as more important than ease of setup, and even the features within the tool.

A significant portion of respondents were concerned that their tool selection caused GPU vendor optimization bias and a similar distribution stated they would prefer a high level cross platform tool (rather than multiple low level vendor specific tools).

Whereas for capture & analysis 56.5% or respondents rated their happiness as 4/5 this was only 26.1% for GPU performance analysis indicating that a significant portion of respondents are not happy with their GPU performance analysis workflow.

General Summary

Over 81% of respondents are using custom or in house engines indicating their need to either develop or license a tool (rather than getting it with an engine such as Unity)

Android is the largest targeted OS, followed by Windows, Linux, IOS and macOS.

Conclusion

Users are satisfied with their current API capture tool-sets this may be due to the roughly equivalent functionality across each of these tools

There is much more dissatisfaction in the usage of performance analysis tools. Due to the lack of a standard mechanism to access hardware counters, developers are locked into using vendor specific tools which certainly reinforces optimization bias.

 

* Note that respondents used multiple tools which accounts for the individual tool tallies exceeding 100%

 

LPGPU2 YouTube channel gets 1000 views!

A big thank you to everyone who is helping to get the word out about LPGPU2. We have now passed 1000 views on our YouTube channel (http://bit.ly/2oyVRqA) which is awesome! As always please keep sharing 🙂

Samsung’s Developer Ecosystem team wants your feedback!

OpenGL, OpenGL ES & Vulkan tool ecosystem survey
A survey to understand how 3D graphics developers are profiling and debugging their OpenGL, OpenGL ES & Vulkan rendering engines. It should take around 5 minutes to complete. Your feedback will help Samsung decide where to invest engineering resources for 3D graphics developer tools & Khronos standardisation.Thanks in advance for sharing your feedback with us!

Joe Davis
Game Ecosystem DevRel Engineer @ Samsung Electronics
https://twitter.com/joedavisdev

Another new video post: LPGPU2 Tools running on Nema!

Samsung has uploaded a video to the you tube channel showcasing the capture tools running on Think Silicon’s Nema and converting the collected data such that it can be loaded by LPGPU2’s fork of AMD’s CodeXl modified by Codeplay.

 

New video on the YouTube channel!

Codeplay have contributed a demo of the combined timeline and performance counter visualization capabilities of LPGPU2’s modified version of CodeXL to the YouTube channel. For a closer look checkout:

https://youtu.be/_IE_I64gsEM

LPGPU2 Project Flyers

After lots of hard work by the consortium we are pleased to show images of the LPGPU2 project flyers which were received from the printers today:

Getting to know….Samsung

The LPGPU2 Team from Samsung (left to right) Hugo, Rob, Albert, Martyn, Lee, Prashant, and Paul.

Read more »

LPGPU2 Flyer and Framework diagrams now available!

After lots of hard work from the LPGPU2 team we are pleased to make the LPGPU2 flyer and framework diagrams available. Please take a look here: http://lpgpu.org/wp/reports/reports/

 

Samsung adds a new team member

Paul has been either a H/W & S/W or S/W & H/W engineer, depending on the main role, for close to 30 years. In this time he has worked on Aircraft Simulators (6 DOF full flight simulation, Cockpit procedure trainers, etc.), gained a first class MEng degree in Microelectronics & S/W Engineering at Newcastle Upon Tyne, and worked at Samsung for almost 20 years working on mobile phone H/W design (10 years), including writing test suite to exercise the H/W, and for the remainder coding drivers (RTOS or Kernel), or applications for Orange IM or Performance Analysis Tools.

Paul will be working on the host elements of the data capture infrastructure initially and will then be working in any/all areas as required.

His interests are: skiing (just back from skiing in Park City Utah for two weeks), cycling (for work and leisure), gym, Sci-Fi (TV and Films)

 

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